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PostPosted: Sun 09 Jan , 2005 12:51 pm 
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For the expert, the less expert and the downright able to burn a salad.

A couple of simple ones to start off:

Pa amb tomaca (Catalan ham sandwich)

Note: you will need Serrano ham or Prosciutto for this recipe. I personally prefer my ham on its own or with a little bread, but this is the most popular way of eating it in Spain, so there must be something to it. :wink:

- Ciabatta or similar bread (i.e., not very crumbly), in slices
- Half a tomato
- Olive oil
- Serrano ham slices

Rub the tomato on the surface of the bread, pour some olive oil, top with a slice of ham and eat. No need to grill or heat or anything.

Mozzarella toast

An Italian version of cheese on toast.

- Once again, ciabatta slices
- Again, olive oil (are you starting to detect a trend in my cooking? :wink: )
- Mozzarella; the fresh kind that comes in a sachet with its own liquid, not the sliced, drier variety
- Oregano

Drizzle some olive oil on the bread. Put a couple of slices of mozzarella on top, sprinkle some oregano on top and put under the grill for a couple of minutes, until the cheese has melted.
Absolutely delicious.

This also works beautifully as a panino or sealed hot sandwich, if you have a panini press or sandwich maker. In that case I like to add a slice of good quality honey roast or smoked ham.

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PostPosted: Sun 09 Jan , 2005 3:29 pm 
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:mrgreen: :mrgreen: ahhhh.. this is great! And since you're volunteering, can I bug you for some olive tappas recipies? And other 'tappas' you might know?
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PostPosted: Sun 09 Jan , 2005 4:02 pm 
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And a potato ommlett, and cake and well anything else you have made and I have snaffelled with relish.

Must cook for you one day Ber, and you too Alandriel ;)

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PostPosted: Sun 09 Jan , 2005 4:44 pm 
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Chicken El Capitan
*disclaimer- you must read the recipe first, as it is typical american- giving all the ingredients, not necessarily in the order in which they are used.

Ingredients
Hen 3.5-4 pound (1.75-2kg) (preferably dead- drained, plucked, fresh or frozen... you get the picture :wink: )
Butter, salad oil or other fat (3 Tbsp)
Carrots, sliced 3 medium
Parsley finely chopped 1 Tbsp
Onion sliced one large
Shallots, 4-5 optional
Green pepper, chopped- 1/2
Garlic, finely chopped 1 clove
Chicken stock or water 1 cup (250ml)
Red wine 1 cup (250ml)
Tomatoes, stewed or canned, 1.5cups (1 lg can)
Peppercorns 8 (hehehehhaahhahhhaaa!
:LMAO: )
Curry powder 1/4 tsp
Thyme, 1/8 tsp
Chili powder 1 tsp
Salt, 1.5 tsps

Prepare chicken for braising and brown in fat (in other words, wash and pat dry.. heat fat and brown the chicken)

Remove chicken to casserole; cover with carrots and parsley
To fat remaining in pan, add onions, shallots, green pepper and garlic; add more fat if needed; cook until soft and lightly browned.

Add stock or water, wine, tomatoes and seasonings; continue cooking about 5 minutes. Pour over chicken and vegetables in casserole.

Cover and bake in a moderate (not leftist or right wing:Q ) oven (325° F- 175°C) 1 1/2 - 2 hours or until chicken is tender.

Thicken sauce if necessary using 1-2 Tbsp flour for each cup liquid. Blend flour with equal amounts of cold water; add to sauce and stir over low heat until thickened, add more salt if desired. Makes about 6 servings.

(a note- to thicken sauce, pour it out of the casserole into a sauce pan, keeping the casserole warming in the oven, continue on to thicken the sauce- add it back to the casserole when properly thickened).

source: Woman's Home Companion Cook Book

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PostPosted: Sun 09 Jan , 2005 7:32 pm 
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Ok, this is going to be Lots of fun to watch...too bad I don't have any actual recipe's to add...I could describe how to make a wicked bean dip, but that's about it for now...

Oh, well, there's that cheesy french bread...hmm, I'll have to dig out some of my recipe's.

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PostPosted: Sun 09 Jan , 2005 8:28 pm 
Milk and kisses
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Hmm... I don't like olives so I don't know any tapas with olives... :scratch Dan makes a good salad with feta cheese cubes and olives, but that's all I know about olives. Sorry Alandriel! I'll try to think of some tapas recipes instead. :)

For now, just to please Din ;)

Spanish potato omelette ("Tortilla de patatas")

For a medium-largeish tortilla:

- 4 medium-sized potatoes (floury ones crumble when cooked, waxy ones keep their shape, so the choice is down to preference about texture :))
- 5 medium eggs
- Oil (I use a mixture of olive and sunflower)
- Salt

Peel and slice the potatoes thinly. Fry in abundant oil in a frying pan, stirring frequently, until golden. It's better to do it over a medium fire, even if it takes longer, so that half the potato slices doesn't overcook and the other half ends up undercooked.

Beat the eggs in a bowl. Drain the potatoes out of the oil and mix in with the beaten eggs. The potatoes should be covered by the egg, otherwise the omelette will end up too dry; if there seems to be far too much potato in the bowl, add another egg. Season to taste.

Remove almost all the oil from the frying pan, leaving just enough to coat the pan. Pour the egg-potato mixture in the pan, turn the fire down and cook very slowly, without stirring.

Now comes the delicate bit. The omelette is too big to turn with the aid of a spatula, so you'll have to cover the pan with a lid or large plate, turn it over, then slide it back into the pan with the uncooked side down. More often than not, at this point liquid egg flies all over the kitchen. ;) A friend gave me a hinged set of pans that fit perfectly with each other and it's been a godsend. :mrgreen:

Cook (over a very slow fire) until the omelette is cooked through. Serve immediately, with bread. It can also be eaten cold; some people prefer day-old tortilla, actually!

Buen apetito. :D

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PostPosted: Sun 09 Jan , 2005 8:39 pm 
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Great. Now I'm hungry.


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PostPosted: Wed 12 Jan , 2005 12:51 am 
Islanded in a Stream of Stars
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I really should do a lot more cooking. I'm not all that happy with the food Iavas and I eat (though I always try to have some vegetables with meals) but I'm too lazy to cook and don't have any recipes. I don't know how you all come home from work and then cook a meal!

Anyway, I was wondering if any of you had a good recipe for Dill Sauce. I had a wonderful dish in this nice restaurant while in England...Salmon fillet with prawns and dill sauce. I'd never had dill sauce before but it was wonderful and went so well with the salmon. I'd like to fix something like that again, but I'm in need of a recipe!

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PostPosted: Thu 13 Jan , 2005 5:32 pm 
Milk and kisses
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As requested... recipe for Billionaire's Shortbread :wink:

(I don't have the amounts with me here, so I'll just write the ingredients down and will edit when I get home)

For the shortbread:
250g plain flour
175g butter
75g sugar
Finely grated zest of 1 orange

For the caramel:
Half a 450g can condensed milk (roughly)
100g butter
70g soft brown sugar
1 tablespoon orange liqueur (Cointreau)

For the chocolate topping:
1 bar (150g) milk (or white - depending on taste) chocolate
1 bar (150g) plain chocolate

First make the shortbread base. Mix the softened butter and sugar with the flour and orange zest until you get a crumbly-textured mixture. Knead until you get a ball of more or less homogeneous dough.

Roll on a floured surface (non-stick baking parchment is good too - it helps to lift the dough off the worktop and into the mould). Line a (buttered and floured) oblong tin with the dough, base and sides. Pinch with a fork.

Place tin in a preheated oven (180C, gas mark 4) and bake for 25-30 min, until light golden brown. Allow to cool.

Caramel.

Place condensed milk, butter and brown sugar in a saucepan over a low to moderate fire, and stir until dissolved. Bring to the boil and allow to boil for 5min, stirring continuously (otherwise it will stick to the bottom of the pan!).

Stir in the Cointreau. Spread the thick caramel sauce over the shortbread and leave to cool and set.

Chocolate.

To finish the shortbread, melt the two chocolate bars separately, in double-boilers or Bain Maries (i.e., not directly over a fire). Pour the dark chocolate over the caramel, then swirl over the white, or viceversa. Use a fork, skewer or cocktail stick to draw feathery, swirly or any other decorative pattern.

Leave to cool and set. Slice into bars; they're delicious off the fridge, with their crunchy chocolate topping. :)

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"The most terrifying day of your life is the day the first one is born [...] Your life, as you know it... is gone. Never to return. But they learn how to walk, and they learn how to talk... and you want to be with them. And they turn out to be the most delightful people you will ever meet in your life."


Last edited by Berhael on Mon 24 Jan , 2005 2:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri 14 Jan , 2005 3:40 am 
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Dill sauce, Eru? :scratch
hmmm.
My hubby makes it likes this:

Fry the salmon in a pan.
When it's done, put it out of the pan.
Pour cream into the pan.
mix mustard into the cream.
Put dill into it.
Make the sauce thick with flour....
sounds easy - is easy.

Damnit, my cooking english is really poor.
Alandriel or Crys or anybody else....
what might be the english equivalent for:
Soßenbinder?

okay, now a real recipe to follow for Eru...

Dillsauce:
40 grammes Butter
40 grammes Flour
1/2 liter broth (fishbroth in the salmon case)
salt and white pepper
4 big spoons Dill (dictionary says tablespoonfuls....)
5 big spoons cream

melt butter, add flour and beat violently with an egg-beater*, so no lumps are left. Mix the broth slowly with it, not too much at a time, until the sauce has nearly the consistence you like. let it boil while stirring it. then add the dill and the cream.

*is it really an egg-beater? Over here we call it a snow-brush..... come to think of it, is it called egg-snow? :help:

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PostPosted: Sun 16 Jan , 2005 5:50 am 
Islanded in a Stream of Stars
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Thanks for that areanor! Does your hubby make it to taste or does he use actual measurements?

The only fresh dill I've found is not cut up...I'm guessing your husband chops it up pretty well before adding it?

Yes, it can be called an egg beater though normally it's called a whisk (if I spelled it right).

Tablespoon is an actual measurement over here too.

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PostPosted: Sun 16 Jan , 2005 11:31 am 
Milk and kisses
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Eru, I make a very simple salmon with dill too; cooking fish is very easy if you have an oven (I'd be lost without mine!).

For 2 people:

- 2 salmon steaks (or 1 salmon fillet)
- 2 tablespoons oil
- roughly a glass of white wine
- Sea salt
- Dill (I use the dried version that you can buy in a jar) - a good pinch
- A little butter (roughly what you would use to spread 1 piece of toast)

Drizzle the oil on to an oven dish, so that the fish won't stick to the bottom.
Put the salmon fillet/steaks in the dish, and pour the white wine over them.
Spread a little butter thinly over the fish (salmon is quite oily so it doesn't need a lot of additional fat).
Sprinkle the salt and dill over the fish.
Put in a medium oven for about 15 minutes. The fish should flake off easily when it's done, and look rather "opaque" (raw fish is more translucid). But be careful not to overcook it, or it will become rather dry and insipid. To avoid this I often cover the dish with aluminium foil, and then remove the foil and put the dish under the grill for a minute or so, until the salmon acquires a bit of a "roast" look.

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"The most terrifying day of your life is the day the first one is born [...] Your life, as you know it... is gone. Never to return. But they learn how to walk, and they learn how to talk... and you want to be with them. And they turn out to be the most delightful people you will ever meet in your life."


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PostPosted: Sun 16 Jan , 2005 5:44 pm 
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Eru, he makes it to taste. method: try and error

Sometimes he adds Vodka before pouring in the cream - most times - when the kids are around eating with us - he adds milk.

Sometimes he adds a spoonful of ketchup - just for the colour.

And yes, he chops the dill. If we haven't fresh one, he adds some dried - though then he'll need to take more. Beside, most often he takes the one we have deep frozen after harvesting it in the summer... :mrgreen:

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PostPosted: Sun 16 Jan , 2005 6:52 pm 
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Quote:
what might be the english equivalent for:
Soßenbinder?


Hmmmm - there is no 'real' translation as far as I know. Here I use corn starch (or flour) to thicken sauces.

Here's an easy chicken recipie which my sis-in-law introduced me to and is great if you're in a 'hurry' or are down to very few things in the fridge/freezer :wink:

1 chicken fillet per person (fresh or frozen, in which case you quickly defrost it) - put in an oven dish
Tomato sauce (I often use ready made pasta sauce e.g. napoletana), heat up in a saucepan and add some red wine (left over one will do :wink: or any 'cooking' wine). Simmer for 4-5 mins and then pour over the chicken.

Put the chicken in the oven for approx. 20mins, then spread some Mozarella cheese on it and cook for another 10mins.

Et voila! :mrgreen:

And while I'm at it... I love red peppers but I get sick of having them in salads all the time and don't usually like them cooked/grilled... except for this recipe.

Caramelized Red Peppers Provencale on toast

Wash and chop red peppers (bell peppers unless you're a real lover of fire!) into stips. Fry with a bit of olive oil for about 20mins!! - it takes that long to get them really nice and 'caramelized'. Stir often. Add peppers, salt and provencale herbs (basil, rosemary,thyme). Spread over warm toast.
Yummmmmmmm!!! :mrgreen:
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PostPosted: Sun 16 Jan , 2005 6:56 pm 
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Quote:
...add some red wine (left over one will do

Is there really such a thing as 'left over red wine'? :shock::nono: But seriously, if that's the chicken dish you fed to us then it's utterly delicious and scarily easy. ;)

I really must get a little notebook so I can write these all down and give them to my cooking elf. :LMAO: :dance:


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PostPosted: Sun 16 Jan , 2005 6:58 pm 
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it is the one :wink: ... now let the poor elf have the puter :mrgreen: you've been 'promising' for hours
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PostPosted: Sun 16 Jan , 2005 7:00 pm 
Troubadour of Ithilien
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But if I give him the computer I'll have to go and iron his shirts. Does that sound like a fair deal to you?


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PostPosted: Sun 16 Jan , 2005 7:02 pm 
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well - yes actually... each one to their slavery. =:) <- oh! It's good to have this guy.
Thank heavens I've done my pile already ... now I only have to clean the kitchen from this weekends 'disaster' at trying to make soap - which this time went totally wrong.

Live and learn :wink:
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PostPosted: Mon 17 Jan , 2005 3:18 am 
Islanded in a Stream of Stars
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I was looking for the white dill sauce Ber, but I can definately try your method so we can have something different. Though I do have a question....what exactly is a medium oven? Over here we use actually temps when cooking...we don't have number settings on the oven but do on the stove. And you say you put the fish under the grill...what grill?

areanor, I ought to try the "by taste" method. I've read that some people use plain yogurt in place of cream to make it less fattening...or some have used sour cream...but that's no better than plain cream. You grow your own dill though? Cool!

Alandriel, your chicken recipe sounds good. How hot does the oven need to be though? I ought to post one of my favorites.

Chicken and Rice

1 cup of uncooked rice (not instant)
1 package of Lipton Onion Soup Mix (or any onion soup mix I guess)
1 can of cream of Mushroom Soup
1 and 1/2 cups of water
2 or 3 boneless chicken breasts

Combine rice, water, and soups. Stir thoroughly. Pour into baking dish (my dad always used a glass one) and place chicken on top of mix. Cover tightly with foild and bake at 400F (not sure what this would be for Europeans...I think 400F is a somewhat high temperature) for 45 minutes.

I always loved it when my dad made this. It's great.

Iavas would really like your red pepper recipe. I could try it, but I'm not that big of a pepper fan. I can only put a little bit of red and yellow ones on my fajitas.


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PostPosted: Wed 19 Jan , 2005 3:15 am 
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Well, I gave making dill sauce a go tonight. I guess I was somewhat successful. I used areanor's husband's method of just trial and error. I used his method as a base, but kind of combined it with some other recipes I've seen. I didn't have any mustard thouh so I'll have to try that next time.

I poured in some half cream (lighter and better for you), added in some butter and a dollup of sour cream for a little zing. I also added some of the juice from the salmon. Then I added in dill and let it simmer. It was tasting slightly bland so I added some garlic salt and more dill...but in the end I put too much dill in. :P The flavor was too strong. I tried some flour to thicken it up but it turned out a bit lumpy...ah well.

I guess it turned out okay for a first try. Iavas did agree that it was a bit strong but he still said it was really good. :)

Thank you all for your help, especially areanor. :)


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