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PostPosted: Mon 09 Nov , 2015 3:19 pm 
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I made bratwurst this weekend out of last year's ground mutton and some pork fat.

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Those are pictures of the last 20 lbs, after I got the recipe right. :) I did three four pound batches before that, trying out the original recipe and then tweaking it. I really liked trial 3, so I did all the rest of the meat that way in one go.

Spices used are: salt, pepper, garlic powder, nutmeg, mace. Milk, palm sugar and soy sauce were also used in the final recipe. :)

I've tried making linked sausages before out of collagen casings, but this is my first time using natural hog casings. They work and taste so much better! Plus ( and this is a big plus) you can cut the links apart after twisting them and the casing doesn't unwind like it does with collagen casings. I don't know why it doesn't untwist, but it doesn't. :shrug:

We really like brats, so this is a good way to eat mutton.


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PostPosted: Mon 09 Nov , 2015 8:57 pm 
The Grey Amaretto as Supermega-awesome Proud Heretic Girl
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On one hand, I can't say that looks good because I don't like brats, but, otoh, they do look good.

Nice job! :)

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PostPosted: Tue 10 Nov , 2015 12:03 am 
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It looks terrifying. But I bet it tastes good. :)

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PostPosted: Tue 10 Nov , 2015 3:46 pm 
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They taste far better than mutton burgers, I can tell you! Not quite as good as Johnsonville brats, but then I don't have MSG in them, either. I tried for the umami flavor by adding soy sauce, but that's not as concentrated a source as MSG.

The ones that busted when I twisted them I recycled through the stuffer attachment on the grinder and for some reason they came out whiter than the others. :scratch: I guess the fat got pulverized smaller and distributed more evenly? I tried one and it tasted OK.

We got started eating brats when we lived in Germany. They aren't common where I or my husband grew up, so both our families are somewhat bemused by our liking for them.


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PostPosted: Mon 14 Dec , 2015 12:13 am 
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I just found this Nigella Lawson recipe online, and I'm posting it as a reminder to myself to try it out:

Quote:
Sweet potato macaroni cheese
Serves 4
sweet potatoes 500g
pennette or other small short pasta 300g
soft unsalted butter 4 x 15ml tbsp (60g)
plain flour 3 x 15ml tbsp
full-fat milk 500ml
English mustard 1 tsp
paprika ¼ tsp plus ¼ tsp to sprinkle on top
feta cheese 75g
mature cheddar 125g, grated, plus 25g to sprinkle on top
fresh sage leaves 4
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 200C/gas 6. Put on a large-ish pan of water to boil, with the lid on to make it come to the boil faster.

Peel the sweet potatoes and cut them roughly into 2-3cm pieces. When the water’s boiling, add salt to taste, and then the sweet potato pieces, and cook them for about 10 minutes or until they are soft. Scoop them out of the water into a bowl – using a “spider” or slotted spoon – and lightly mash with a fork, without turning them into a purée. Don’t get rid of this water, as you will need it to cook your pasta in later.

In another saucepan, gently melt the butter and add the flour, whisking to form a roux, then take the pan off the heat, slowly whisk in the milk and, when it’s all combined and smooth, put back on the heat. Exchange your whisk for a wooden spoon, and continue to stir until your gently bubbling sauce has lost any floury taste and has thickened. Add the mustard and the ¼ teaspoon of paprika. Season to taste, but do remember that you will be adding cheddar and salty feta later, so underdo it for now.

Cook the pennette in the sweet-potato water, starting to check 2 minutes earlier than packet instructions dictate, as you want to make sure it doesn’t lose its bite entirely. Drain (reserving some of the pasta cooking water first) and then add the pennette to the mashed sweet potato, and fold in to combine; the heat of the pasta will make the mash easier to mix in.

Add the feta to the sweet potato and pasta mixture, crumbling it in so that it is easier to disperse evenly, then fold in the white sauce, adding the grated cheddar as you go. Add some of the pasta cooking water, should you feel it needs loosening up at all.

Check for seasoning again, then, when you’re happy, spoon the brightly sauced macaroni cheese into 4 small ovenproof dishes of about 375-425ml capacity (or 1 large rectangular dish measuring about 30 x 20 x 5cm deep and 1.6 litre capacity). Sprinkle the remaining cheddar over each one, dust with the remaining ¼ teaspoon of paprika, then shred the sage leaves and scatter the skinny green ribbons over the top, too.

Put the pots on a baking tray, pop into the oven and bake for 20 minutes (or, if you’re making this in a larger dish, bake for 30–35 minutes), by which time they will be piping hot and bubbling, and begging you to eat them.

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PostPosted: Mon 14 Dec , 2015 2:26 pm 
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:sick:

But I hope you enjoy it! :P

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PostPosted: Mon 21 Dec , 2015 3:22 pm 

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How did the recipe turn out?
Sweet potatoes, cheddar, feta cheese, pasta and sage, combined, doesn't sound the least bit appetizing to me - though otherwise I like them all. But sometimes things turn out better than they sound.


A Christmas cookie recipe I rediscovered this year. The honey makes it taste a little different than similar cookies:

Butterballs:

8 tbsp butter, unsalted
3 tbsp honey
1 cup flour
1/2 tsp salt
1 tbsp vanilla (tbsp is not a typo - it really is that much)
1 cup pecans, finely chopped

powdered (confectioners') sugar for coating

Cream butter, add honey, salt, and vanilla, beat until smooth. Add flour and pecans, mix lightly until dough just comes together. Chill dough for about an hour. Form into balls about the diameter of quarters. Bake at 300 F on greased cookie sheets for 35-40 minutes. Roll in powdered sugar while still slightly warm (sugar will melt slightly and become sticky). Roll again in powdered sugar once they're completely cool.

Makes about 36

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PostPosted: Mon 21 Dec , 2015 3:40 pm 
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I was going to say that those sound like Russian teacakes except for the honey.

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PostPosted: Tue 12 Jan , 2016 1:52 am 
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Hey, inky! I made Lángos tonight! :drool:

I used a bit of garlic salt and sour cream or Greek yogurt. They were delicious.

Quote:
Lángos

Ingredients (makes about 10 lángos, it depends on the size)

- 300 g all-purpose flour
– 7 g dried (instant) yeast
– 250 ml water
– 1/2 teaspoon salt
– sunflower oil for frying
– toppings: sour cream, grated cheese, garlic

Method

In a mug dissolve the salt in the water. In a bowl combine the sifted flour with the yeast. Add salty water to it and stir through (if it’s very sticky, add a little bit more flour). Work the dough with a wooden spoon or with your hands until the dough comes off the bowl and gets smooth. Leave the dough in the bowl, cover with a clean cloth and let it rise for 30-40 minutes or until it has doubled in bulk.

Once it is rested, carefully tip out the dough onto a floured surface, stretch out into a square and cut out about 10 cm (3,93 inch) round shapes with a big glass (big cookie cutter also good). Stretch out each piece with your fingers into a rund shape with the centre being thinner than the edges. Let the pieces rest for another 30 minutes on the floured surface.

In a saucepan heat sunflower oil. Place lángos into the hot oil, fry it on one side until golden brown then turn. Repeat with the remaining lángos dough.

Serve while it’s hot. You can eat it simple or sprinkle with chopped garlic or douse with garlic water and top with grated cheese and sour cream.

Enjoy!


http://www.ziziadventures.com/2012/08/l ... -food.html

Here's my pic. I got a bit better as I went along, and the rest were even more golden brown.

Attachment:
langos.jpeg
langos.jpeg [ 392.8 KiB | Viewed 9282 times ]

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PostPosted: Tue 12 Jan , 2016 1:25 pm 

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Now why didn't you send me some. ;)

I make a pseudo version, once in a while, with leftover bread dough. Not quite the same as getting it from a street vendor in Hungary, but not bad.

Speaking of which, I had meant to ask if you ever make kalács at Christmas. I make an easy version using dough from the bread machine, if you want the recipe.

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The building of castles in sand, of queens in snow,
That we cannot make any corner in life or in life's beauty,
That no river is a river which does not flow.

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PostPosted: Tue 12 Jan , 2016 1:30 pm 
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I'd be interested in that recipe.

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PostPosted: Tue 12 Jan , 2016 3:10 pm 
The Grey Amaretto as Supermega-awesome Proud Heretic Girl
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One day I'll get some from a street vendor in Hungary. :D Mmm.

I have not made kalács but would love your recipe! Please!

And if you have a good recipe for kiffles/kolaches, I would love that, too. My grandma's recipe died with her, and I've not had good luck with the ones I've found online. (I'm sure there's a good recipe out there somewhere; I just haven't found it yet.)

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PostPosted: Tue 12 Jan , 2016 4:53 pm 
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Is kolaches that pastry with the cream cheese centre? There was a recipe in Cooks' Illustrated a while back, and I actually made it. Do you want me to scan it for you?

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PostPosted: Tue 12 Jan , 2016 5:47 pm 

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Quote:
And if you have a good recipe for kiffles/kolaches, I would love that, too.


I'm not sure. Sometimes there are regional differences in words and foods.

The kifli my mother used to make were little crescent-shaped rolls usually filled with ground nuts. The main difference between her kifli and kalács, besides the size, was that the kalács is a yeast dough, and the kifli wasn't. I'm pretty sure they were made with baking powder. I haven't made them, but there seem to be recipes in Hungarian online. I can translate one for you sometime, but work is a bit busy, so it could be a while.

There's also a bunch of kifli recipes here. Any of them look like what you want?

http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-0,hungarian_kifli,FF.html

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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan , 2016 4:29 am 
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Kifli is what we called them. Here is a picture of what I'm talking about:

Attachment:
Hungarian_Apricot_Kolaches-131216-6625.jpg
Hungarian_Apricot_Kolaches-131216-6625.jpg [ 92.39 KiB | Viewed 9262 times ]


I have had them with the nut filling, but I prefer the apricot.

Is the kalács what I would know as a nut roll or poppyseed roll?

Attachment:
HungarianNutAndPoppySeedRolls.jpg
HungarianNutAndPoppySeedRolls.jpg [ 24.47 KiB | Viewed 9262 times ]


My grandma and the ladies at her church would get together to make these around Christmastime. (I sure wish she'd invited me!)

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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan , 2016 1:28 pm 

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Your kifli looks different than what I know, but the dough might be similar, just rolled and filled a little differently. I'll have a look at the online recipes sometime. The first Hungarian kifli recipe I came across yesterday had no resemblance to what I know - 4 egg whites whipped with sugar, 4 egg yolks mixed with the rest of the sugar, then flour and butter folded in - so there are probably many versions. If you want to search yourself, I googled the words kifli and Magyar, figuring that would get me a more authentic recipe. There might be some versions already translated into English, though I didn't see any offhand.



Quote:
Is the kalács what I would know as a nut roll or poppyseed roll?


Yes. Though I thought afterward that kolach is how most Americans would try to pronounce kalács. Anyway, here's my easy kalács recipe:

Dough make in bread machine, on dough cycle

7/8 cup buttermilk
1 egg
4 tbsp butter
¼ cup sugar
1 tsp salt
¼ tsp baking soda
3 cups flour
1.5 tsp yeast

Divide dough in half. Roll out each piece into a large rectangle (at least 9 x 11 inches, or as big as you can get it without the dough tearing. Spread filling over the dough and roll the dough up from one end like a jelly roll. Seal the ends and seam as much as possible so the filling won’t ooze out, and place the two rolls seam side down, side by side on a baking pan. Spread melted butter over the top, let rise in the refrigerator overnight, or on the countertop for maybe 30-40 minutes. Bake at 325 or 350 until the outside is medium brown. The timing can be a little tricky, but you want to be sure none of the dough in the middle is underdone, without actually burning the dough on the outside.. Let cool and slice.


Filling:
My family traditionally made a nut version and a poppyseed version. This is where it gets subjective.

The simplest version of the nut type is to grind the nuts very finely (a rotary-type fine nut grater works best), and add sugar to taste. I grind roughly a cup of nuts (can’t remember exactly, but I usually end up with a pasta bowl that’s heaped with ground nuts) , add maybe 3 heaping tablespoons of sugar, then taste and go from there. I also add a little grated lemon rind – maybe half a teaspoon – and a small amount of heavy cream, half and half or butter – just enough that the filling sticks together a little, rather than being a big, fluffy, hard-to-work-with pile of nuts and sugar. I’ve made walnut, hazelnut and pecan versions and all turned out well. The amount of filling can vary, though it's usually a generous amount. The only thing to watch out for is that if you put too much in, it will weigh the dough down and not turn out well.

The poppyseed version is similar, but probably an acquired taste. You grind the poppyseeds and add sugar. I looked for proportions on this (haven’t made it in a while myself), and found one recipe that said ½ pound of poppy seeds, 2 tbsp honey, ½ cup sugar, 2 tbsp butter. 2 tsp lemon juice, ½ tsp grated lemon rind, +/- a pinch of cinnamon. I don’ think I ever added butter myself (the ground poppy seeds themselves are sticky), lemon or cinnamon.

I’ve also experimented with other versions, like adding a couple of tablespoons of cocoa or chocolate to ground hazelnuts and sugar.

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The building of castles in sand, of queens in snow,
That we cannot make any corner in life or in life's beauty,
That no river is a river which does not flow.

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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan , 2016 3:20 pm 
The Grey Amaretto as Supermega-awesome Proud Heretic Girl
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Thank you for the recipe! I will print it off and attempt it some day. :)

I actually prefer the poppyseed version to the nut version, but they are both very good.

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PostPosted: Wed 03 Feb , 2016 4:33 pm 

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Lali, I don't know if this recipe might be similar to your grandmother's, but it does call for apricot jam. Its dough seems similar to my mother's.

http://gabicsek.blogspot.com/2012/08/sargabaracklekvaros-kifli.html

translated recipe:

35 dkg flour
25 dkg margarine
1 egg
pinch of salt
about 1 dl sour cream

Knead together* the dough, adding the sour cream at the end. You want it to still be soft, but not sticky. Let the dough rest in the refrigerator at least one hour (can do overnight).

Divide dough into 3-4 balls, roll each out into a circle on a floured surface, and cut each with a knife into 8 wedges. Put a small spoonful of jam on the widest edge of each wedge, and roll into a crescent.

Bake on parchment paper for 15-20 minutes in a preheated oven at 200 C. Sprinkle generously with vanilla sugar.

Her vanilla sugar recipe: 1 packet vanilla sugar mixed with a generous amount of powdered sugar.


*Just mix it together with your hands; don't knead it like bread dough. I imagine you could also mix it in a food processor.

A couple of other possibilities for kifli (in English):
http://community.tasteofhome.com/community_forums/f/30/t/24573.aspx

http://globalcookies.blogspot.com/2007/10/hungary-kifli.html

http://zsuzsaisinthekitchen.blogspot.com/2011/11/bakery-crescents-pek-kifli.html


The trouble is, "kifli" just means crescent, so there are lots of versions (mostly rolled and shaped slightly so they look like a crescent moon - or a croissant)

btw, I went for the traditional Hungarian kifli recipes, because I guessed that your grandmother decided to use a different shape so the jam wouldn't ooze out as readily - especially when you use a soft American jam. But hers might be a completely version of kifli.


dl = deciliter (1/10 of a liter)
dkg = dekagram (0.01 kg or 10 grams)

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It is this we learn after so many failures,
The building of castles in sand, of queens in snow,
That we cannot make any corner in life or in life's beauty,
That no river is a river which does not flow.

- Louis MacNeice, Autumn Journal


Last edited by aninkling on Thu 04 Feb , 2016 8:48 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Wed 03 Feb , 2016 8:57 pm 
The Grey Amaretto as Supermega-awesome Proud Heretic Girl
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Thank you! I really appreciate you typing that up and looking into it. I will file it away for the next time I'm feeling ambitious. Sarah is my chef, so I'll probably rope her into helping me. :D

:hug:

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PostPosted: Wed 03 Feb , 2016 9:51 pm 
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Incidentally, what's a dkg?

And dl? (tenth of a litre?)

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