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PostPosted: Fri 13 Feb , 2015 4:42 pm 
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Wanna know what happens when you throw out leftover pizza dough, perhaps unaware of what raw dough does?

Check out this BBC article

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PostPosted: Sat 14 Feb , 2015 3:09 pm 
The Grey Amaretto as Supermega-awesome Proud Heretic Girl
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:LMAO:

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PostPosted: Tue 17 Feb , 2015 11:33 pm 
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Best Ever Sourdough Oatmeal Bread

Just made this - I used buttermilk instead of the milk. It actually takes less time than the Norwich Bread (still several hours, but if you start in the morning, it can actually be done by lunch).

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PostPosted: Sun 26 Apr , 2015 12:05 am 
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Inky, if you see this, we just lost a month's worth of posts. Can you repost that bread recipe that you posted a few days ago?

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PostPosted: Wed 29 Apr , 2015 12:49 pm 

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Here you go, Jude.

1 cup water
3 cups flour (bread flour or all purpose)
1.5 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
1 cup sourdough starter (substituted for the levain in the original couronne recipe)
0.5 tsp yeast

Adjust flour or water to make a slightly soft dough. Knead and let rise once (I make it in the bread machine to this point).

Line a Dutch oven with parchment paper, and lightly oil the paper or spray it with cooking oil spray. Shape dough, put it in the parchment paper, and let it rise again until doubled. Lift the dough out of the Dutch oven, using the parchment paper like a sling so the dough doesn’t deflate.

Preheat the oven to 450 to 500 degrees, and put the Dutch oven (with lid) in to heat for 15 to 30 minutes (the original recipe for Dutch oven bread baking said 500 for 30 minutes, but I haven’t seen any difference at 450 for 15 minutes.).

Lift the bread with the parchment paper again and put it back in the heated Dutch oven. Let any excess paper hang over the sides and put the lid on. Reduce oven temp to 425 and bake the bread for 30 minutes, then take the lid off and bake 20-30 minutes longer or until brown.

I don’t think I mentioned this before, but I usually shape the dough by flattening it out into a thick disk (more or less) with my hands, then pull the edges into the middle to make a ball, and place it seam side down. I don’t know if it really makes any difference vs just rolling it into a ball, but the bread I make this way ends up with small air pockets throughout. The Dutch oven is what gives it the crisp crust and chewier texture than the bread I make on a pizza stone.

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PostPosted: Wed 29 Apr , 2015 1:10 pm 
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Thanks!

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PostPosted: Thu 07 May , 2015 8:14 pm 
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We made pastrami yesterday.

It was delicious!

I haven't had pastrami before, so I didn't know what to expect.

We soaked a beef roast in salt water for about 10 days, and then smoked it and then roasted it (because we got impatient that the smoker was taking so long)

Then we cooled it completely and sliced it very thin the next day. VERY good. It's ham made out of beef, really. But there's a name for that already, so I might as well say pastrami.

We are going to explore different things to do to beef, since we have so much of it.


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PostPosted: Fri 08 May , 2015 2:52 am 
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That sounds very good! :drool:

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PostPosted: Fri 08 May , 2015 3:19 pm 
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Now I'm wishing we'd cut more beef roasts instead of grinding all the tough parts. Toughness isn't an issue when you slice it very thin across the grain.

I bet venison would be good that way, too. And lamb....


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PostPosted: Fri 08 May , 2015 4:50 pm 
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Did you soak it raw? Did you change the water, or just keep it in the same water for 10 days?

How long should it be smoked?

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PostPosted: Fri 08 May , 2015 6:51 pm 
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Soaked it raw. Didn't change the water. Smoked it about 2 hours at around 220 F, but then moved it inside and roasted it for a couple of hours at 325 F, until the internal temperature was about 165 F.

It was a 4 or 5 lb roast, so it was taking a while to heat up.

The recipe said soak it for a week, but after 7 days it wasn't convenient for us to set up the smoker, so we let it go a few more days. I did turn the meat over after the first few days.

The recipe also said one cup of salt to one gallon of water plus some curing salts. I didn't want the curing salts so I just added another half cup of salt to the solution. Kosher salt, because iodized salt does something weird to cured meat (and I can't remember what!) We'll just have to eat it all in the normal amount of time that is OK for left overs... or freeze some.

Other recipes I've read say to heat the soak water first and dissolve the salt and then chill the water and then add the meat. Having a bunch of undissolved salt in the bottom of the bowl didn't seem to hurt anything, though. It was all dissolved after the week was over so I don't think it would make a difference.

Most recipes say that when you take the beef out of the water to rub the outside with all kinds of spices before you smoke it. I didn't do that. It turned out fine. I probably will do that if I pastrami-ize some mutton. Mutton has a fairly strong odor that, in my opinion, needs disguising.

I just ground the mutton we got from the sheep we culled last year. It makes a passable sausage if you grind it several times using the fine setting on the grinder. It will be nice to have something else to do with the mutton we get from the sheep we cull this year.


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PostPosted: Fri 08 May , 2015 7:27 pm 
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I think I might give that a try...

If I just want to smoke and not roast, how long do you think I should smoke it for?

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PostPosted: Mon 11 May , 2015 3:04 pm 
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I'd go by internal meat temperature, if I were you. Smoking meat has such a wide range of variables that it's hard to go just by time. How hot your fire is, how hot the day is, how big the piece of meat is....

I did learn something new the other day, though. Internal meat temperature continues to rise for a while after you remove the meat from the heat. So if you take it out exactly at the doneness you want, the internal temperature will actually continue rising for a little while afterwards. So don't wait until the perfect temperature to remove the meat from the heat. :) Our pastrami was a pretty large chunk of meat, and so I took it out at 158 F. The temp continued to rise until 165 F. :Q


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PostPosted: Tue 26 May , 2015 6:22 pm 
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We made brisket pastrami and lamb pastrami this past week. We tried it at lunch today. Both were delicious, but I think I like the lamb best.

edit: the next time we butcher an adult sheep, we'll be trying mutton pastrami. :)


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PostPosted: Fri 12 Jun , 2015 4:40 pm 

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I've been trying to use up our leftover frozen blueberries before the new crop. This recipe turned out well.

Roast breast of chicken with red wine/ blueberry glaze.

For glaze, mix:
1 pint blueberries
1 cup red wine
1 cup maple syrup
1/4 cup Dijon mustard

Bring glaze ingredients to a boil on the stove, then lower the heat and simmer until reduced by a third. The recipe says at low temp for an hour, 15 minutes. This seems to make a lot of glaze and uses a lot of maple syrup, so I'd either cut down the amount, or make the full recipe and store some of it in the refrigerator or freezer until next time.

Split 4 chicken breasts in half, sprinkle with salt, pepper, garlic powder, paprika and fresh parsley, to taste, and roast at 400 F for 30 minutes. Spread the glaze over the chicken and continue roasting until juices run clear and meat is tender.

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That we cannot make any corner in life or in life's beauty,
That no river is a river which does not flow.

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Trump Warns That Democrats Would Drag Nation Back to Days of Tolerance and Decorum


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PostPosted: Fri 12 Jun , 2015 5:05 pm 
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Hmmm, that sounds intriguing. I'm not sure I'd like the sweetness of it with chicken, but I could cut down the amount of maple syrup like you suggested.

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PostPosted: Fri 12 Jun , 2015 7:30 pm 
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I'd have never thought blueberries and meat would go together. :scratch:

It occurs to me that I'm learning to cook for the fourth time.
1st- normal cooking
2nd- gluten free cooking
3rd- no nightshade cooking

and now 4th- very low carb/high fat cooking. At first I didn't think this would be anything more than restricting one category and emphasizing the other... but there's a whole new skill set associated with cooking very low carb while putting in as much fat as possible. After 2 weeks of rather repetitive menus, I'm finding some very innovative recipes online. The few I've had time to try are quite good.

Who ever heard of mashed cauliflower as a sub for mashed potatoes, for instance? Really yummy! http://heinstirred.com/2014/05/12/garli ... ower-mash/

edit: And I've always hated cauliflower! :scratch:


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PostPosted: Fri 12 Jun , 2015 8:05 pm 

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Now there's something I would never have thought to substitute for mashed potatoes.

One thing I learned about cauliflower (from a Cook's Illustrated cauliflower soup recipe) is that it becomes sweeter and less "cabbage-y" the longer it cooks. I make a baked cauliflower dish that transforms itself and tastes much milder after cooking. If anyone's interested, you cut apart half a head of raw cauliflower and put it in a pan, spread a little butter mixed with spices over it (maybe 2-3 tbsp butter, 1 clove minced garlic, a pinch of salt, 1/4 tsp cumin and a little bit of grated lemon peel) and bake it tightly covered at 375 for about an hour until it's very soft. I wasn't sure about the cumin at first (not a huge curry fan), but it's surprisingly subtle.

Lali, I was skeptical about the sweetness of the glaze over chicken, too, but the taste of the glaze changed and sort of melded with the chicken after baking. But I did use less glaze than they suggested. Maple syrup is too expensive to use a whole cup on one dinner.
Apparently, it's an old recipe from a book called "Cooking in the Shaker Spirit."

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It is this we learn after so many failures,
The building of castles in sand, of queens in snow,
That we cannot make any corner in life or in life's beauty,
That no river is a river which does not flow.

- Louis MacNeice, Autumn Journal


Trump Warns That Democrats Would Drag Nation Back to Days of Tolerance and Decorum


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PostPosted: Sat 13 Jun , 2015 3:01 pm 
The Grey Amaretto as Supermega-awesome Proud Heretic Girl
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I have seen the recipes for the cauliflower/mashed potato swap. So it's good?

I make a roasted cauliflower that is amazing! It's similar in spices to the one you describe, inky, but this gets roasted on a cookie sheet and broiled at the end. It really is divine. I do like cauliflower, but this doesn't end up tasting like cauliflower really. It's like a yummy, sort of crispy something.

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PostPosted: Sat 13 Jun , 2015 6:47 pm 
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Is that the recipe from Cook's Illustrated? I just discovered it last week, and it really is good! Drizzled with olive oil and sprinkled with salt and pepper. Yum.

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