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PostPosted: Thu 14 Nov , 2019 12:56 am 
A green apple painted red
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I have asked many questions about books I considered reading, but "how may sentences is it?" was not one that ever crossed my mind.

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PostPosted: Fri 15 Nov , 2019 1:59 pm 

Joined: Fri 10 Aug , 2012 4:42 pm
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My guess is that it's probably borderline unreadable. :) Booker prize, in the description, is usually a dead giveaway that I'm going to hate it. I don't know if it was always this way, but their main criterion now seems to be that the book be as avant-garde as possible.


btw, has anyone read any of Farley Mowat's books?
https://www.umanitoba.ca/cm/cmarchive/vol20no6/farleymowat.html
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/farley-mowat-said-what-he-meant-and-loudly/article18594937/

I really enjoyed The Boat Who Wouldn't Float, his tales about rebuilding a boat in Newfoundland and sailing her along the south coast. Somewhat exaggerated, I'm sure, but they're good stories and funny. I didn't like The Dog Who Wouldn't Be quite so much, though there are some good bits.

I've looked into others, but A Whale for the Killing sounds utterly depressing, and some of the rest either seem to be children's books or straight nature descriptions. And parts of The Dog Who Wouldn't Be make me wonder whether I'd like the rest. I'm not usually bothered by bygone attitudes in books, but some of the casual cruelty in there bothered me. Maybe he saw setting his dog on someone's cats and killing them as funny when he was a kid, but a reasonably empathetic adult should have known better than to think that was a good story, even in the 1950s. It's a little strange, because he had plenty of empathy in The Boat Who Wouldn't Float, for both people and animals.

And, yeah, I know, some people had that attitude toward cats in the 1950s, but my parents are as old as Mowat and neither of them would have found causing pain to any animal (or its owner) remotely funny. They sometimes killed pigs or chickens for food, but it wasn't a source of pleasure, just something you had to do.

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Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities. ― Voltaire


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PostPosted: Fri 15 Nov , 2019 4:23 pm 
Aspiring to heresy
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I didn't know that about the Booker prize. Oh well, I've reserved it, so I'll give it a try when it comes in.

I read some of Farely Mowat's books as a kid, but I remember very little about them.

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PostPosted: Sun 24 Nov , 2019 7:13 am 
Try to stay perky
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So, how was it, Jude?

I've just finished The Keepers of the House, by Shirley Ann Grau, written in 1964.

It's set in Alabama, and it directly confronts the burning of issue of the time - race relations.

Born and bred in the south, Grau has an insider's perspective. The book chronicles the lives of a family of landowners over the course 100 or more years, and she is merciless. Her writing is gripping, sophisticated and clean, and it won her a Pullitzer Prize.

Warning: the N - word appears in both vulgar and formal iterations. IMO totally appropriate in context but I know some people find any use unacceptable.

Thoroughly recommend. I'm seeking out her other books.

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PostPosted: Sun 24 Nov , 2019 9:37 am 
Aspiring to heresy
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Impenitent wrote:
So, how was it, Jude?k

I'm #129 on the list, and there are 40 copies. So I'm estimating it'll take about a year before I get to read it, unless other people cancel their holds.

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PostPosted: Sun 24 Nov , 2019 10:34 am 
Try to stay perky
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Persistence is the operative word!

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PostPosted: Tue 26 Nov , 2019 10:55 pm 
The Grey Amaretto as Supermega-awesome Proud Heretic Girl
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Impy, thanks for the suggestion! I'll have to check it out.

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