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PostPosted: Tue 24 Feb , 2009 4:02 pm 
Not so deep as a well

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Estel threatened, but I'm beating her to it. :D

Facebook has a meme bouncing around with a list of 100 books, which may or may not have been slapped together by the BBC, out of which they say most have read at best six.

The list is, shall we say, somewhere between eclectic and pointless. It's neither a list of the best nor the most important nor even the most well-known, but a mishmash of all with some inappropriate inclusions by type (Shakespeare wrote plays. You should see plays.) There was a polite but unimpressive smattering of novels translated into English, some modern overrated best sellers, and the Bible (which kinda counts as a translation too). There was the Chronicles of Narnia AND The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe. :suspicious:

So follows MY list of 100 books, and my criteria: I include only works of fiction originally published in English, because I'm not competent to judge enough literature of other languages to make a respectable list. No plays, no collected poetry (epics are OK :D ), no non-fiction, no scripture. Memoir is OK so long as it doesn't become autobiography. For writers whose work is predominated by their short stories, I reserve the right to refer to them as a whole.

I'm not promising no snark. :D

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Last edited by Axordil on Tue 24 Feb , 2009 7:01 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Tue 24 Feb , 2009 5:18 pm 
Not so deep as a well

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Pre-twentieth century

Before 1800 (13 titles):

Geoffrey Chaucer: Troilus and Cressida
Thomas Malory: Le Morte D'arthur
Edmund Spenser: The Faerie Queene
John Milton: Paradise Lost
Alexander Pope: The Dunciad
Daniel Defoe: Robinson Crusoe, Moll Flanders
Samuel Richardson: Clarissa
Lawrence Sterne: The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman
Horace Walpole: The Castle of Otranto
Ann Radcliffe: The Mysteries of Udolpho
Henry Fielding: The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
William Blake: Jerusalem

1800-1850 (12 titles):

Jane Austen: Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Emma
Mary Shelley: Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus
Charles Dickens:David Copperfield, A Tale of Two Cities
Edgar Allan Poe: Stories
Herman Melville: Moby-Dick, or The Whale
Emily Bronte: Wuthering Heights
Charlotte Bronte: Jane Eyre
Sir Walter Scott: Ivanhoe
George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron: Don Juan
William Makepeace Thackeray: Vanity Fair

1850-1900 (25 titles):

Nathaniel Hawthorne: The Scarlet Letter, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun
George Eliot: Middlemarch, The Mill on the Floss, Silas Marner
Thomas Hardy: Far from the Madding Crowd, Tess of the D'Urbervilles
Stephen Crane: The Red Badge of Courage
Robert Louis Stevenson: Treasure Island, Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: Sherlock Holmes stories, especially The Hound of the Baskervilles
Mark Twain: Life on the Mississippi, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (essentially a memoir and a novel version of the same thing :D), The Prince and the Pauper, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court
Henry James: What Maisie Knew, The Portrait of a Lady, The Americans
Lewis Carroll: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
H.G. Wells: The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds
Oscar Wilde: The Picture of Dorian Gray
Rudyard Kipling: The Jungle Book, Kim
Anthony Trollope: The Way We Live Now

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PostPosted: Tue 24 Feb , 2009 6:07 pm 
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:banana: Finally a good list!

But I don't have time to look at it right now. :whistle: :scared:

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PostPosted: Tue 24 Feb , 2009 6:15 pm 
of Vinyamar
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I'm unimpressed, sorry. The other list may not have been legit, but hey, its a Facebook Meme? Were you really expecting literary analysis?

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PostPosted: Tue 24 Feb , 2009 6:32 pm 
Not so deep as a well

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Twentieth Century (50 titles)

1900-1945 (28 titles):
Ernest Hemingway: A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls
John Steinbeck: The Grapes of Wrath, Of Mice and Men
William Faulkner: The Sound and the Fury, As I Lay Dying
Joseph Conrad: The Heart of Darkness, The Secret Agent
F. Scott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby
E.M. Forster: A Passage to India
T.S. Eliot: The Waste Land, The Four Quartets
Evelyn Waugh: Brideshead Revisited
Jack London: The Call of the Wild
O. Henry: Stories
George Orwell: 1984, Animal Farm
Aldous Huxley: Brave New World
Sinclair Lewis: Babbitt
James Joyce: Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses
D.H. Lawrence: Sons and Lovers
Djuna Barnes: Nightwood
Virginia Wolff: Mrs Dalloway, To the Lighthouse
Edgar Rice Burroughs: Tarzan of the Apes, A Princess of Mars
W. Somerset Maugham: Of Human Bondage

After WW II (22 titles):
Jean Rhys: Wide Sargasso Sea
Kurt Vonnegut: Cat's Cradle, Slaughterhouse-Five
J.R.R. Tolkien: The Lord of the Rings
J.D. Salinger: Catcher in the Rye
William Golding: Lord of the Flies
Ray Bradbury: Stories, especially Something Wicked This Way Comes
Wole Soyinka: Ake: The Years of Childhood
Harper Lee: To Kill a Mockingbird
Vladimir Nabokov: Lolita
V.S. Naipaul: A Bend in the River
Graham Greene: The Heart of the Matter, The Quiet American
Thomas Pynchon: The Crying of Lot 49
Robert Heinlein: Stranger in a Strange Land
Doris Lessing: The Golden Notebook, The Fifth Child
Toni Morrison: Sula, Beloved
Saul Bellow: Henderson The Rain King
Stanley Elkin: The Living End
Stephen King: The Shining

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Last edited by Axordil on Tue 24 Feb , 2009 6:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue 24 Feb , 2009 6:44 pm 
Not so deep as a well

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Alatar-

I didn't know I was trying to impress. :P

What I am doing is listing 100 books that have interested, intrigued, affected, shaped or otherwise proven memorable and worthwhile for me, within the field I know best, literature in the English language. It may not be the best books ever written, but they're 100 books that have mattered to me in that context. It is at least a thematically cohesive attempt, unlike the FB list, which for me is inchoate, distractingly so. Obviously,if it didn't bug me, I wouldn't have taken the time and spent the energy to make this list.

And I think any list of this type is very much a product of analysis. The only question is whether or not the analysis has any value. For me, this list has a lot of value--it is in fact a definition of what I value, when thinking about creative writing--and thus I feel no need to defend it. It's mine: everyone has their own. The one on FB feels like, well, no one's.

Although if it starts discussions, it at least can be congratulated for that. :)

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PostPosted: Tue 24 Feb , 2009 8:26 pm 
of Vinyamar
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But isn't that kind of the point. This is yours, nobody else's. Whether its any better or worse than the supposed BBC one is moot. And yes, I feel you were trying to impress. Trying to impress upon us all that the other list was beneath you. Which is what I found annoying, and yes, still do. Your list is no more or less definitive, so why feel the need to correct? What makes the two Dickens novels you chose more important than any of his others?

Discuss? Sure. Denigrate? Not so much.

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PostPosted: Tue 24 Feb , 2009 8:54 pm 
Not so deep as a well

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They have Dan Brown. I think that ends this discussion. :D

ETA:

OK, that was too glib and snarky. :)

Here's my point: yes, I am denigrating their list, although much of it is perfectly all right. When you put out a list and say "how many of these have you read" it can't help but come off as "books you should read" or "the best books" or some such, unless you label it otherwise. That's why I labeled mine otherwise.

The fundamental problem with the BBC list is its methodology, that it's neither flesh nor fish nor fowl: there are clearly things thrown in there as afterthoughts (thus the doubling up on C. S. Lewis) or foreign-language tokens or best-sellers just so everyone can say they've read SOMETHING on it. One might as well go to a bookstore or Amazon and pick 100 random books, except even that is more honest.

I have to add I'm not sure why you seem to take my dislike of the list so personally. It's not YOUR list. I don't have a problem with what you've read. What's up?

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PostPosted: Tue 24 Feb , 2009 9:46 pm 
of Vinyamar
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I'm just gonna answer you, then let it go. First off, a look on google shows its obviously not a BBC list, but again, thats kinda the nature of Facebook. Its why they're called Memes, you just take it at Face value, if you'll pardon the pun, and either pass it on or not. As I say, its not meant to be serious. Why I took your reaction personally is that it pretty much implies that those of us who didn't have a problem with the list were somehow too dumb to see that it wasn't perfect. Do you honestly think I never noticed that LWW and Narnia were both there, or that Hamlet and the Complete Works were? Cause that's what your post suggests. That only you are educated enough to see that the list is bogus. And that is insulting, yes.

You responded to my note, on my Facebook, effectively saying "What a load of Bollocks". And if you don't see why I might find that rude, then I certainly can't make it any clearer.

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PostPosted: Tue 24 Feb , 2009 10:09 pm 
Not so deep as a well

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I'm sorry if you felt insulted. That really wasn't my intent, nor I suspect Estel's, who also had problems with the list, I believe. Yet...if I passed along a list of 100 Broadway musicals that asked who had seen how many, and on it were included half a dozen operas, Handel's Messiah (AND the Hallelujah Chorus ;) ), a few Gilbert and Sullivan pieces, and "Springtime for Hitler," I would not be insulted if someone pointed out the list had issues. If it was someone I knew who had professional interest or training in the field, I might even enjoy talking or joking about the issues.

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PostPosted: Tue 24 Feb , 2009 10:47 pm 
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Your list will obviously never make it as a facebook meme, Ax. Because you don't list each book individually. Some authors have two books next to their names. What's up with that? I don't get nearly as much satisfaction if I have to write, for example:

Ernest Hemingway: A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls - yes, no
John Steinbeck: The Grapes of Wrath, Of Mice and Men -yes, no
William Faulkner: The Sound and the Fury, As I Lay Dying - no, yes

...since I read A Farwell to Arms, but not For Whom the Bell Tolls, etc.

I feel way better if I get to write yes! next to a book with no no's next to it too.


Fix it please.







;) :P

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PostPosted: Tue 24 Feb , 2009 10:53 pm 
Not so deep as a well

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Quote:
I feel way better if I get to write yes! next to a book with no no's next to it too.


I know I like saying yes to no-nos myself. :D

I blame message boards. :devil:

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PostPosted: Wed 25 Feb , 2009 12:47 am 
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Ermmmmmm.....


Lord of the Rings
The Count of Monte Cristo
The Bell Jar
The Scarlett Letter
Crime and Punishment
The Grapes of Wrath
Treasure Island
1984
Night
The Chronicles of Narnia
The Great Gatsby
Anne of Green Gables
Lord of the Flies
Fahrenheit 451
Pride and Prejudice
Persepolis (ok, ok. Graphic novel. But it was moving)
God’s Debris
The Testament of Gideon Mack
The Religion War

Ermmm…does reading part, count? :blackeye:

The Decameron
The Illiad
Arabian Nights part I
Utopia

Waiting on my shelf…

The Man in the Iron Mask
Wuthering Heights
Le Morte D’Arthur
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
The Odyssey
The Three Musketeers

Bunches of fantasy (read)…

Tigana
The Lions of Al-Rassan
Song for Arbonne
Sabriel
Lirael
Abhorsen
Pratchett x many
Interview with the Vampire
Ship of Magic
The Mad Ship
Silmarillion
Unfinished Tales
HP all

Yeah maybe I can make one of these lists in 20 years or so. :blackeye: :D :P

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PostPosted: Wed 25 Feb , 2009 12:48 am 
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See, this is why it's good that I don't have the time to encompass Facebook in addition to the MBs and Livejournal!

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PostPosted: Wed 25 Feb , 2009 7:24 am 
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I went to the BBC website and searched for "100 books" and found that they had done a survey of the most beloved books, in 2003. In the news release they said
Quote:
We're searching for Britain’s best-loved fiction across television, radio, online and interactive services, kicking off with a BBC2 TV show when celebrities present their favourite reads on 5 April.

We will then be inviting the nation to vote for their best-loved book on the website or by phone leading to an announcement of the Top 100 books later in the month.
They have not done a survey since then, as far as I can tell. I've read quite a few of these, as well as those in your list, Ax. These are obviously lighter weight than the ones in your list, because they include kids' books and books that are comfortably easy to read.

1. The Lord of the Rings, JRR Tolkien
2. Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
3. His Dark Materials, Philip Pullman
4. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams
5. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, JK Rowling
6. To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
7. Winnie the Pooh, AA Milne
8. Nineteen Eighty-Four, George Orwell
9. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, CS Lewis
10. Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë
11. Catch-22, Joseph Heller
12. Wuthering Heights, Emily Brontë
13. Birdsong, Sebastian Faulks
14. Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier
15. The Catcher in the Rye, JD Salinger
16. The Wind in the Willows, Kenneth Grahame
17. Great Expectations, Charles Dickens
18. Little Women, Louisa May Alcott
19. Captain Corelli's Mandolin, Louis de Bernieres
20. War and Peace, Leo Tolstoy
21. Gone with the Wind, Margaret Mitchell
22. Harry Potter And The Philosopher's Stone, JK Rowling
23. Harry Potter And The Chamber Of Secrets, JK Rowling
24. Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban, JK Rowling
25. The Hobbit, JRR Tolkien
26. Tess Of The D'Urbervilles, Thomas Hardy
27. Middlemarch, George Eliot
28. A Prayer For Owen Meany, John Irving
29. The Grapes Of Wrath, John Steinbeck
30. Alice's Adventures In Wonderland, Lewis Carroll
31. The Story Of Tracy Beaker, Jacqueline Wilson
32. One Hundred Years Of Solitude, Gabriel García Márquez
33. The Pillars Of The Earth, Ken Follett
34. David Copperfield, Charles Dickens
35. Charlie And The Chocolate Factory, Roald Dahl
36. Treasure Island, Robert Louis Stevenson
37. A Town Like Alice, Nevil Shute
38. Persuasion, Jane Austen
39. Dune, Frank Herbert
40. Emma, Jane Austen
41. Anne Of Green Gables, LM Montgomery
42. Watership Down, Richard Adams
43. The Great Gatsby, F Scott Fitzgerald
44. The Count Of Monte Cristo, Alexandre Dumas
45. Brideshead Revisited, Evelyn Waugh
46. Animal Farm, George Orwell
47. A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens
48. Far From The Madding Crowd, Thomas Hardy
49. Goodnight Mister Tom, Michelle Magorian
50. The Shell Seekers, Rosamunde Pilcher
51. The Secret Garden, Frances Hodgson Burnett
52. Of Mice And Men, John Steinbeck
53. The Stand, Stephen King
54. Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy
55. A Suitable Boy, Vikram Seth
56. The BFG, Roald Dahl
57. Swallows And Amazons, Arthur Ransome
58. Black Beauty, Anna Sewell
59. Artemis Fowl, Eoin Colfer
60. Crime And Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky
61. Noughts And Crosses, Malorie Blackman
62. Memoirs Of A Geisha, Arthur Golden
63. A Tale Of Two Cities, Charles Dickens
64. The Thorn Birds, Colleen McCollough
65. Mort, Terry Pratchett
66. The Magic Faraway Tree, Enid Blyton
67. The Magus, John Fowles
68. Good Omens, Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
69. Guards! Guards!, Terry Pratchett
70. Lord Of The Flies, William Golding
71. Perfume, Patrick Süskind
72. The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists, Robert Tressell
73. Night Watch, Terry Pratchett
74. Matilda, Roald Dahl
75. Bridget Jones's Diary, Helen Fielding
76. The Secret History, Donna Tartt
77. The Woman In White, Wilkie Collins
78. Ulysses, James Joyce
79. Bleak House, Charles Dickens
80. Double Act, Jacqueline Wilson
81. The Twits, Roald Dahl
82. I Capture The Castle, Dodie Smith
83. Holes, Louis Sachar
84. Gormenghast, Mervyn Peake
85. The God Of Small Things, Arundhati Roy
86. Vicky Angel, Jacqueline Wilson
87. Brave New World, Aldous Huxley
88. Cold Comfort Farm, Stella Gibbons
89. Magician, Raymond E Feist
90. On The Road, Jack Kerouac
91. The Godfather, Mario Puzo
92. The Clan Of The Cave Bear, Jean M Auel
93. The Colour Of Magic, Terry Pratchett
94. The Alchemist, Paulo Coelho
95. Katherine, Anya Seton
96. Kane And Abel, Jeffrey Archer
97. Love In The Time Of Cholera, Gabriel García Márquez
98. Girls In Love, Jacqueline Wilson
99. The Princess Diaries, Meg Cabot
100. Midnight's Children, Salman Rushdie

The Facebook meme, on the other hand, has the following books in it, which look somewhat similar, like maybe someone started with the BBC list and peppered it with some personal favorites.

1. Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
2. The Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkien
3. Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
4. Harry Potter series - JK Rowling
5. To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
6. The Bible
7. Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte
8. 1984 - George Orwell
9. His Dark Materials - Philip Pullman
10. Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
11. Little Women - Louisa M Alcott
12. Tess of the D’Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy
13. Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
14. Complete Works of Shakespeare
15. Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurier
16. The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
17. Birdsong - Sebastian Faulk
18. Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
19. The Time Traveller’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
20. Middlemarch - George Eliot
21. Gone With The Wind - Margaret Mitchell
22. The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald
23. Bleak House - Charles Dickens
24. War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
25. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
26. Brideshead Revisited - Evelyn Waugh
27. Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
28. Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
29. Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll
30. The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
31. Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
32. David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
33. Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis
34. Emma - Jane Austen
35. Persuasion - Jane Austen
36. The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis
37. The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
38. Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
39. Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden
40. Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne
41. Animal Farm - George Orwell
42. The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown
43. One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
44. A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving
45. The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
46. Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery
47. Far From The Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy
48. The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood
49. Lord of the Flies - William Golding
50. Atonement - Ian McEwan
51. Life of Pi - Yann Martel
52. Dune - Frank Herbert
53.Cold Comfort Farm - Stella Gibbons
54. Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
55. A Suitable Boy - Vikram Seth
56. The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon
57. A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
58. Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
59. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time - Mark Haddon
60. Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61. Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
62. Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
63. The Secret History - Donna Tartt
64. The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold
65. Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
66. On The Road - Jack Kerouac
67. Jude the Obscure - Thomas Hardy
68. Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding
69. Midnight’s Children - Salman Rushdie
70. Moby Dick - Herman Melville
71. Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
72. Dracula - Bram Stoker
73. The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett
74. Notes From A Small Island - Bill Bryson
75. Ulysses - James Joyce
76. The Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath
77. Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
78. Germinal - Emile Zola
79. Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
80. Possession - AS Byatt
81. A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
82. Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
83. The Color Purple - Alice Walker
84. The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro
85. Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
86. A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry
87. Charlotte’s Web - EB White
88. The Five People You Meet In Heaven - Mitch Albom
89. Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
90. The Faraway Tree Collection - Enid Blyton
91. Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
92. The Little Prince - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
93. The Wasp Factory - Iain Banks
94. Watership Down - Richard Adams
95. A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
96. A Town Like Alice - Nevil Shute
97. The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas
98. Hamlet - William Shakespeare
99. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - Roald Dahl
100. Les Miserables - Victor Hugo

And if anyone is interested, I've read 37 from Ax's list, 56 from the BBC list and 59 from the faux BBC list (though I did not finish all of them I started)

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PostPosted: Wed 25 Feb , 2009 9:38 am 
of Vinyamar
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That list is from the BBC's "Big Read" project Laureanna, and is more about popularity than any attempt at literary criticism. As you say, I imagine someone decided to use it as a starting point and put in some other "notables".

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PostPosted: Wed 25 Feb , 2009 10:46 am 
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hehehe - better to use the BBC list in the case of best loved books for me - my list would read like a.... well, it wouldn't be pretty :help:

Look Alatar, no one meant to hurt, demean or insult you. Really truely, no one did. Your response to this has been so strong... :poke: :hug: :hug: :hug:

As for just dealing with facebook memes - I've changed almost every single one I've done so far, though I haven't posted them to facebook yet. It's not meant to be an insult to their creators, it's just that most of the ones I've seen are meant for people who are still quite young. Since I don't live with my parents or go to school, I change or delete questions like that. Though the BBC list could be for people of any age, when it comes to language or nationality, it might not work so well, so people think of new ideas.

There was never any insult meant towards you, and that you are so incredibly strongly insulted is... frankly darlin, you seem to be sulking a little bit. I understand your frustration, trust me. I've also made efforts on things in the past only to have people ignore or change what I started. Thing is, if I were you, I would almost be flattered by what's going on. It means people actually care about your idea and are trying to expand on it, rather than just filling out yet another facebook note thing and not really caring about it one way or another. You came up with something good enough that people wanted to personalize it completely and steal the idea for themselves - what is so insulting about that?

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PostPosted: Wed 25 Feb , 2009 11:43 am 
of Vinyamar
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Don't worry Estel, I'm not as offended as I sound. I find it frustrating and rude, more than offensive. And for the record, it wasn't my idea. It was just a meme I gakked from someone else, so there's no personal stake here. Its just a matter of courtesy for me. YMMV.

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PostPosted: Wed 25 Feb , 2009 1:38 pm 
Pure Kitsch Flavor
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Joined: Wed 27 Oct , 2004 6:47 pm
Posts: 5046
Location: London
Ok. I was just getting rather worried about you. I've not seen you react like that very often. You're usually one of the most calm people I know.


Alatar wrote:
YMMV.


What does this mean?

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PostPosted: Wed 25 Feb , 2009 1:46 pm 
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Joined: Sat 06 May , 2006 9:46 pm
Posts: 4766
Location: Kentucky
I had to look it up myself. Your Mileage May Vary.

:cool:

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